system.debugger.functions Definition/System Debugger

system.debugger.functions

Command system.debugger.functions Definition/System Debugger
Applicable release versions: AP, R83
Category System Debugger (42)
Description briefly discusses the functions and commands that are available using the replace or assignment function, "=".

Once a valid address has been specified, the debugger accesses the requested location and displays its current contents. The cursor is positioned to the right of an "=" sign, indicating that the debugger is ready to either accept any of the following special functions or change the contents of the window.

/ctr1 .0120 =

The following commands are available in response to the "=" prompt character that appears as the result of a legal debugger command:

/ctr1 .0120 =<return>

(carriage return). Returns control to the debugger command processor (!). This leaves the window unchanged.

/ctr1 .0120 =<lf> .0043 =

(linefeed). Displays the next "window" of data, on the same line.

/ctr1 .0120 =<ctrl>+n
1890.94 .0043 =

Displays the address and the contents of the next window on the next line which includes decimal frame and hex offset.

/ctr1 .0120 =<ctrl>+p
1890.90 .0020 =

Displays the address and the contents of the previous window on the next line which includes decimal frame and hex offset.

c*bmsbeg;10 employees ='string

Places the characters "string" at the beginning of the displayed window for the length of string, which may not exceed forty bytes. The string must terminate with a <return>, <enter>, <lf>, <ctrl>+n, or <ctrl>+p.

/ctr1 .0120 =decimal number

Places the value of the decimal number in the displayed window, filling from the right, if the window is 1, 2, 4, or 6 bytes in length, and does not cross a frame boundary. The string must terminate with a <return>, <enter>, <lf>, <ctrl>+n, or <ctrl>+p.

/ctr1 .0120 =.hexadecimal string

Places the value of the hexadecimal string in the displayed window, filling from the left. The string must contain an even number of hexadecimal characters, and may not exceed 38 hexadecimal characters. Notice the "." prefix. This distinguishes between hexadecimal and decimal entries. The string must terminate with a <return>, <enter>, <lf>, <ctrl>+n, or <ctrl>+p.

/h0 =b<return>
1891.f:0 =<ctrl>+n
1891.f:1 ={1 or 0}

The b shows data in binary mode, 1's and 0's are the only legal values allowed to be entered and must terminate with a <return>, <enter>, <lf>, <ctrl>+n, or <ctrl>+p. Notice the most significant bit is bit zero and least significant is bit 7 in a displayed byte.

/ctr1 .0121 =0

(zero). Clears the window to hex zeros. The string must terminate with a <return>, <enter>, <lf>, <ctrl>+n, or <ctrl>+p. Any size window can be cleared with a single zero.

/ctr1 .0120 =a
1891.92 .0120 =

Redisplays the address and contents of the last window.

/ctr1 .4445 =c
1891.92 DE=c4
1891.92 DEFG =c.2;2
1892.94 FG =

These forms change the display type, window and offset if specified, and redisplay either the original field with the new type and/or window specification, or the resulting field if the offset is changed. The string must terminate with a <return>, <enter>, <lf>, <ctrl>+n, or <ctrl>+p. "c" is for character mode display and ";" is the window width. "c.2;2" moves the window over bytes and displays a window of 2 bytes.
Syntax
Options
Example
Purpose
Related system.debugger.r
system.debugger.drs
system.debugger.dfs
system.debugger.dws
system.debugger.m
system.debugger.muld
system.debugger.n
system.debugger.off
system.debugger.p
system.debugger.subd
system.debugger.time
system.debugger.u
system.debugger.x
system.debugger.y
system.debugger.z
basic.debugger.de
basic.debugger.debug
system.debugger.db
system.debugger.a
system.debugger.c
system.debugger.d
system.debugger.g
system.debugger.i
system.debugger.l
system.debugger.w